Archive for “January, 2016”

Bellanger Gossip statue in Winnipeg

#GeekReads: 5 Quick Reads that Made Us Smarter

In this week’s #GeekReads: gossip as a social skill; the economics of immigration; the view from outer space; living a ‘brain-healthy’ life; political roadblocks.

Hardwired to gossip. Evolutionary psychologists explore the origin of gossip and its prevalence in human society. From The Conversation via Psy Post.

Chasing the American dream. A study by the National Bureau of Economic Research compares waves of immigrants over time and how they fit into the American economy. From Gillian B. White via The Atlantic.

“How’s the view?” One researcher explores how seeing the Earth from space can promote a cognitive shift in awareness. From The Conversation via PHYS.

The brain that changes itself. The science of neuroplasticity has led some to believe that we’re not stuck with the brain we’re born with. From Will Storr via Pacific Standard.

Political gridlock. A political scientist argues that negative feelings, not ideological differences, do more to keep politicians from compromise. From Jim Patterson via Futurity.

 

Tweet us your #GeekReads at @w0nderlab.

Image: flickr/Dano CC BY 2.0

Martin Luther King Jr mural in classroom

#GeekReads: 5 Quick Reads that Made Us Smarter

In this week’s #GeekReads: lessons on social justice; generational shifts in thinking; how experiencing pain can increase empathy; non-verbal communication; catching friendly germs.

More than “a Dream.” Educators and activists advocate a fresh, more comprehensive approach to teaching about the black civil-rights movement and Martin Luther Kings, Jr.’s life. From Melinda Anderson via The Atlantic.

Cultural psychology. A study of British Bangladeshi migrants finds that migrant thinking styles can shift toward non-migrant thinking styles after just one generation. From Alex Mesoudi and Kesson Magid via The Conversation.

I feel your pain. Experiencing personal pain makes us more likely to feel sympathetic and understanding towards others’ suffering. From Danielle Levesque via Psy Post.

Ugh. Our brains recognize emotions conveyed through non-verbal vocalizations faster than emotions conveyed through words. From McGill University via Psy Post.

Community microorganisms. A new study found that the more chimpanzees interacted socially, the more their gut bacteria resembled each other’s. From Nathan Collins via Pacific Standard.

 

Tweet us your #GeekReads at @w0nderlab.

Image: flickr/Joe Goldberg CC BY 2.0

Faces on the subway

#GeekReads: 5 Quick Reads that Made Us Smarter

In this week’s #GeekReads: how dogs process human faces; the queer legacy of Ziggy Stardust; a Fitbit for feelings; the production of vocal emotion; anti-Muslim bias in the media.

Written on your face. A study finds that dogs are able to recognize and categorize human emotional states. From University of Lincoln via Science Daily.

Defying labels. David Bowie lived a life that defied labels and influenced a generation of LGBT youth. From Catherine Kustanczy via Pacific Standard.

Fitbit for feelings. A new wristband gathers data from your body to graph a visualization of your emotion levels throughout the day. From Michele Debczak via Mental Floss.

Tone it down. By digitally altering the tone of a speaker’s voice, researchers uncover new insights about vocal emotional perception. From Lund University via Psy Post.

Muslims in the media. A study finds that exposure to negative media representations of Muslims may increase support for anti-Muslim public policies. From Jared Wadley via Futurity.

 

Tweet us your #GeekReads at @w0nderlab.

Image: flickr/Transformer18 CC BY 2.0

Scared cat

#GeekReads: 5 Quick Reads that Made Us Smarter

In this week’s #GeekReads: the benefits of anxiety; story motifs across time; healthy social networks; origins of phobias; links between the amygdala and kindness.

Detecting social threats. Anxious people may process social threats in a different region of the brain than less anxious people. From eLife via Science Daily.

Story skeletons. From perilous journeys to brave new worlds, the structure of storytelling remains much the same across time. From John Yorke via The Atlantic.

Healthy relationships. A recent study finds strong social relationships can help to reduce health risks throughout a person’s life. From University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill via PsyPost.

Pre-wired fear? A lack of understanding of how fear is acquired can lead us to believe that phobias are pre-wired when in fact they may be more of an adaptation. From Graham C.L. Davey Ph.D. via Psychology Today.

Monkeying around. By observing amygdala activity in rhesus macaques, researchers can predict when one monkey will behave charitably toward another. From Michele Berger via Futurity.

 

Tweet us your #GeekReads at @w0nderlab.

Image: flickr/Dat CC BY-ND 2.0

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