Archive for “February, 2016”

#GeekReads: 5 Quick Reads that Made Us Smarter

In this week’s #GeekReads: brain size and extinction risk; chocolate on the brain; impulses towards retribution; the online spread of Ebola fears; the legacy of Harper Lee.

Extinction vulnerability. Surprisingly, animals with larger relative brain sizes may face greater risk of extinction. From Stanford University via Futurity

A chocolate a day. Regularly eating chocolate may help the brain retain mental sharpness. From Tom Jacobs via Pacific Standard.

Crime & Punishment. A philosopher offers a different vision for our country’s justice system, less based on punishment, and more on rehabilitation and empathy. From Neil Levy via Aeon.

Snowballing stress. With the help of the Internet, stress and fear have the ability to spread faster and further than other emotions. From Adrienne Berard via Nautilus.

Take a walk in someone else’s skin. Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird reflects a respect not just for the arc of history, but for the hope that it does indeed bend toward justice. From Megan Garber via The Atlantic.

 

Tweet us your #GeekReads at @w0nderlab.

Image: flickr/Ken Teegarden CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

Viewmaster

#GeekReads: 5 Quick Reads that Made Us Smarter

In this week’s #GeekReads: replaying rewarding memories; writing the good and bad; cross-language brain interaction; animating the immigration debate; beyond “victimhood.”

Memory loop. Our brain replays memories of rewarding situations as we rest. From University of California, Davis via Psy Post.

Escaping “likability.” Author Tony Tulathimutte talks about getting away from writing “good,” morally upstanding protagonists. From Joe Fassier via The Atlantic.

Bilingual brains. Learning two languages reshapes the structure and networks in the brain. From Penn State via Psy Post.

Bordertown. A new animated show, set in the fictional Southwest, uses satire and comedy to explore opposing sides of the immigration debate. From Mandalit del Barco via NPR.

Transcending the “victimhood” narrative. One migrant shares his story of prolonged, painful initiation that shaped the man he is today. From Sarah Menkedick via Aeon.

 

Tweet us your #GeekReads at @w0nderlab.

Image: flickr/Geof Wilson CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

Weighing the brain and heart on a scale

#GeekReads: 5 Quick Reads that Made Us Smarter

In this week’s #GeekReads: a new age of news; emotions vs. reason; how television can inspire altruism; extreme do-gooders; gender bias in the media.

Social media bubbles. Viral news sources, tailored to individual users’ likes and profile characteristics, are contributing to a growing news gap. From Angela Phillips via The Conversation.

Emotion-driven morality. Harvard psychology professor Joshua Greene examines the role of emotions in our moral decision-making. From Lauren Cassani Davis via The Atlantic.

Meaningful media. A recent study suggests people are willing to help others from different groups after watching meaningful, uplifting media. From Penn State via PsyPost.

Extreme altruists. Theoretically, the world would be a better place if we were all do-gooders all of the time, but one author studies the realistic implications. From Regan J. Penaluna via Nautilus.

Seen, not heard. New research finds that women are more often seen in media via pictures than heard through their stories or opinions. From Nathan Collins via Pacific Standard.

 

Tweet us your #GeekReads at @w0nderlab.

Image: flickr/Ajari CC BY 2.0

#GeekReads: 5 Quick Reads that Made Us Smarter

In this week’s #GeekReads: the empowering potential of citizen-led science; color and emotion; teaching empathy through dance; uncovering unconscious bias; gender differences in fear behavior.

Citizen-led science. Citizens are taking a more hands-on approach in scientific research and policy decisions that affect their communities. From Andrew Maynard via The Conversation.

Seeing red. Scientists examine the conscious effects of color on our emotions and what behaviors each color evokes. From Danielle Levesque via Psy Post.

Schoolroom salsa. A New York nonprofit brings ballroom dancing to schools to teach kids emotional skills like respect, teamwork, and empathy. From Audrey Cleo Yap via The Atlantic.

Call it like I see it. Unconscious processes, such as a schemas and heuristics, allow us to interpret the physical world and shape our judgment as well as behavior. From Richard E. Nisbett via Nautilus.

Frozen with fear. A study of learned fear behavior in male and female rats may point to possibilities for better treatment for people with PTSD. From Thea Singer via Phys.

 

Tweet us your #GeekReads at @w0nderlab.

Image: flickr/Charlie Marshall CC BY 2.0

Heartwired: A Strategy Guide for Change-Makers Download It Today!
Hello. Add your message here.