Archive for “March, 2016”

Handicap accesible parking

#GeekReads: 5 Quick Reads that Made Us Smarter

In this week’s #GeekReads: the Nobel Peace Prize for educators; the spectrum of varying ability; empathy through opera; improving customer recommendations through artificial empathy; hardwired for altruism.

Destigmatizing disabilities. In a culture where genetic mutations stand in for entire identities, Sara Hendren wants to change cultural understandings of disability. From Ankur Paliwal via Nautilus.

Building peace. A Palestinian teacher and former refugee who advocates non-violence was honored with the Global Teacher of the Year Award. From Amanda Froelich via True Activist.

A soldier’s tale. A new opera based on the actual experiences of Christian Ellis, a trained opera singer who enlisted in the Iraq War, brings healing and empathy. From Neda Ulaby via NPR.

Artificial empathy. Marketing researcher Shasha Lu is developing software that can infer people’s internal state based on information they emit from facial expressions or responses. From University of Cambridge via Phys.

Inherently prosocial. Recent studies show that the brain is naturally altruistic, and that increasing empathy is possible through noninvasive procedures. From UCLA via Science Daily.

 

Tweet us your #GeekReads at @w0nderlab.

Image: flickr/Shawn Campbell CC BY 2.0

Blue and yellow beach umbrellas

#GeekReads: 5 Quick Reads that Made Us Smarter

In this week’s #GeekReads: lucky loyalty effect; the youngest published author; problem solving across ideology; the effects of housing segregation on health; brain mechanics behind fear.

The Lucky Loyalty Effect.  New research suggests that consumers believe the more loyal they are to a brand, the more likely they are to receive preferential treatment. Via Cognitive Lode.

Young minds. Nine-year-old Anaya Lee Wullabus is the youngest person in the U.S. to publish a chapter book. From Taryn Finley via The Huffington Post.

Different folks.  Conservatives and liberals don’t differ in their capacity to solve problems; they differ in the processes used to solve them. From Northwestern University via Psy Post.

Drawing lines. A recent study examines the adverse health effects of racial segregation. From Olga Khazan via The Atlantic.

Fear-provoked decisions. Fear and anxiety can over-engage entire brain circuits and disengage brain cells, interfering with decision making. From The University of Pittsburgh via Science Daily.

 

Tweet us your #GeekReads at @w0nderlab.

Image: flickr/Ed Dunens CC BY 2.0

Mural of people's faces

#GeekReads: 4 Quick Reads + 1 Watch that Made Us Smarter

In this week’s #GeekReads: the surge of singlehood; hashtag activism; moral flip-flopping; universal story structure; irrational preferences.

Families of choice. There has been a shift in the traditional form of family, from marriage and nuclear families to more of an emphasis on individualism. From Bella DePaulo via Nautilus.

#Change. New research from American University’s Center for Media & Social Impact examines the power of hashtags to ignite movement in social change. From American University via PsyPost.

Moral flip-flopping. Research suggests that, for most individuals, moral character is very stable and not so likely to change. From Gerry Everding via Futurity.

From exposition to denouement. Professor Paul Zak discusses the effects of the classic dramatic arc on our brain chemistry, and ultimately on our decisions and actions. From Future of Storytelling via Aeon.

Rationalizing being irrational. A new study examines how our irrational choices go hand in hand with making better choices overall. From Nathan Collins via Pacific Standard.

 

Tweet us your #GeekReads at @w0nderlab.

Image: flickr/Garry Knight CC BY 2.0

Books stacked

#GeekReads: 4 Quick Reads + 1 Watch that Made Us Smarter

In this week’s #GeekReads: Chris Rock takes on Oscar diversity; fighting for public health; The Great Migration; taking a hard look at racial assumptions in publishing; how books can keep us on the edge of our seat.

Exclusion at the awards. Oscar host Chris Rock used comedy to address the reality that people of color are often underrepresented in film and television. From Eric Deggans via NPR.

Empowered by science. One team of researchers and scientists helped to educate and rally the people of Flint, Michigan. Via The Conversation.

The Great Migration. A short film shines light on the migration of six million African Americans from the rural South to the North over a hundred years ago. From Carlos Javier Ortiz via The Atlantic.

Disparities in publishing. New York Times Magazine editor Chris Jackson discusses how editors’ assumptions can shrink writers of color to a sliver of their identity. From Brandon Tensley via Pacific Standard.

“Not all was as it seemed.” A team of Stanford grad students examine where emotions like suspense come from when we read. From Clifton B. Parker via Futurity.

 

Tweet us your #GeekReads at @w0nderlab.

Image: flickr/Moyan Brenn CC BY 2.0

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