Archive for “April, 2016”

Vincent Van Gogh painting an iPhone

#GeekReads: 5 Quick Reads that Made Us Smarter

In this week’s #GeekReads: remembering one of music’s great; gender neutral bathrooms at the White House; facing fears; sensing the gist of the world; avoiding empathy burnout.

The loss of an icon. Prince was a symbol for activism and revolution, who called for change and fought for justice, and the steps he took for social justice will not soon be forgotten. From True Activist.

Gender neutral bathrooms. President Obama opens the first gender neutral restroom at The White House. From Maria Caspani via Charisma News.

Scary stories. One author seeks to empower and inspire her young readers through scary stories. From N.D. Wilson via The Atlantic.

The illusion of realitySome neuroscientists argue that the world is nothing like the one we experience through our senses. From Cell Press via Science Daily.

Empathy burnout. The stress of opening ourselves up to the suffering of others can leave us feeling hardened, but forming a goal to alleviate suffering can make empathy feel less draining. From Jamil Zaki via Nautilus.

 

Tweet us your #GeekReads at @w0nderlab.

Image: flickr/JD Hancock CC BY-2.0

Puppy scared of larger dog

#GeekReads: 5 Quick Reads that Made Us Smarter

In this week’s #GeekReads: political disengagement; Zootopia and “otherness”; refugee resettlement in the United States; fearful possibilities; expectancy-based memory.

Conflict avoidance. A researcher assesses which types of political stimuli might be most stressful to citizens. From The College of William Mary via PHYS.

Predator vs prey. Disney’s latest movie Zootopia shines a line on the politics of fear in the United States. From Scott Lucas via The Conversation.

Refugee resettlement. The U.S. takes in far fewer refugees than its counterparts around the world. Priscilla Alvarez explores complex American responses to refugee resettlement. Via The Atlantic

Uncertainty effect. People are more likely to be stressed out by the possibility of an event than the inevitability of one. From University College London via Science Daily

Memory formation. We are more likely to remember information if there is an expectation that we will need to recall the information in the future. From Penn State via Psy Post.

 

Tweet us your #GeekReads at @w0nderlab.

Image: flickr/Quiddle CC BY-SA 2.0

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