All posts in “Boredom”

Guinea Pig with video game controller

#GeekReads: 4 Quick Reads + 1 Watch that Made Us Smarter

In this week’s #GeekReads: attentiveness and emotional comprehension in children; using magic to tell the truth; violent crime in America; decision-making in the visual cortex; villainizing video games.

Lost in a daydream. A recent study suggests that some children who frequently appear to be daydreaming may be occupied with trying to figure out the emotions of others. From The Conversation via PsyPost.

Magical realism. Author Salman Rushdie explains how he uses techniques such as fantasy and dream to express a vision that is grounded in reality. From Salman Rushdie via Big Think.

“Out of tension comes opportunity.” Attorney General Loretta Lynch discusses violent crime in America and the importance of conversation between police and the communities they serve. Via NPR.

Mind’s eye. New research has found that the visual cortex of our brain, which is responsible for seeing, also has the capacity to make decisions without the help from traditional ‘higher level’ areas of the brain. From Andy Henion via Futurity.

The video game debate. Dr. Rachel Kowert discusses how our appetite for cause and effect explanations may cause us to oversimplify discussions of video games and their effects on behavior. From Jesse Singal via Science of Us.

 

Tweet us your #GeekReads at @w0nderlab.

Image: flickr/Katherine McAdoo CC BY 2.0

#GeekReads: 5 Quick Reads that Made Us Smarter (Jan 17)

In this week’s #GeekReads: Computers that know us better than our friends; getting bored to get creative; meditating to become more empathetic; the psychology of the Internet misogynist; and recruiting job-seeking millennials with a focus on social impact.

 

Bored and brilliant. In a world of tech overstimulation, sometimes the best way to generate creativity is old-fashioned boredom. Via NPR.

Think different. How Zen meditation changed the way that Steve Jobs understood the world and what we can learn from his experience. From Drake Baer via Business Insider.

Computers that really know us. By analyzing the things we like on Facebook, computers may end up knowing us better than our best friends. Is this how Skynet takes over the world (Terminator, for the non-geeks)? Via Futurity.org.

The Internet misogynist. How the anonymity of online comments reveals the sexism lingering in the hearts and minds of many men. From Olga Khazan via The Atlantic.

Mission-minded millennials. How social impact, more than compensation, can attract job-seeking millennials. From Ariel Schwartz via FastCoExist.com.

Tweet us your #GeekReads at @w0nderlab.

 

 

Image: flickr/Louis K., CC BY-SA 2.0

 

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