All posts in “Fear”

old victorian children's books

#GeekReads: 5 Quick Reads that Made Us Smarter

In this week’s #GeekReads: diversifying books; trusting others; new brain technologies; deviating from gender roles; predicting feelings.

Multicultural characters. Author, Dashka Slater, examines the lack of color and diversity in children’s literature. From Dashka Slater via Mother Jones.

Linking causes. New study finds trust is a key motivator in movement participation. From American Sociology Association via Science Daily.

Neuroethics. Scientific advances in brain technologies come with ethical questions. From Andrew Maynard via The Conversation.

Sexism in society. Journalist, Peter Beinart, evaluates why some fear women in positions of power. From Peter Beinart via The Atlantic.

Affective forecasts. Personal prejudice directly affects how empathetic we are towards others. From Association for Psychological Science via Psy Post.

 

 

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Image: flickr/pettifoggist CC BY-SA 2.0

Chairs posed for conversation

#GeekReads: 5 Quick Reads that Made Us Smarter

In this week’s #GeekReads: opening up conversations about race; connections between emotional, mental and physical health; contagious generosity; brain systems that contribute to empathy; operating on instinct.

Open conversation. Psychologists Keith B. Maddox and Heather L. Urry work to motivate people to approach rather than avoid conversations regarding race. From Jacqueline Mitchell via Phys.

Emotional health.
New research explores the way our emotions directly affect our physical health. From Christina Sarich via Collective Evolution.

Contagious generosity. We are more likely to be empathetic when we observe others’ empathetic responses. From Tom Jacobs via Pacific Standard.

Cognition, not sensation. Understanding and empathizing with someone else’s pain is neurologically different from experiencing our own physical pain. From University of Colorado at Boulder via PsyPost

Fight or flight. Rachael Sharman discusses the functional and adaptive purposes of the fight, flight, or freeze response to a feared stimulus. From Rachael Sharman via The Conversation

 

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Image: flickr/refreshment_66 CC-BY-ND 2.0

Woman in room with yellow wallpaper

#GeekReads: 5 Quick Reads that Made Us Smarter

In this week’s #GeekReads: beauty in the breakdown; environmental impact on well-being; the trouble with “colorblind” racial attitudes; anxieties about death; fostering empathy via Facebook.

The sanity of madness. We are programmed to feel like we always need to be on top of our game but sometimes a “good” breakdown can allow us to reconnect with ourselves. From Alexa Erickson via Collective Evolution.

The world around us. Environments can have a detrimental or beneficial influence on our well-being and decision-making. From Frontiers via Psy Post.

Seeing color. Claiming to be blind to race can discount and alienate those who experience racial inequalities. From University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign via PHYS.

Facing mortality. The fear of death underlies most of our fears and phobias. From Lisa Iverach via The Conversation.

Social interaction. In a new study, adolescents who frequently use social media increased their levels of both cognitive and affective empathy. From Tom Jacobs via Pacific Standard.

 

 

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Image: flickr/JD Hancock CC-BY-2.0

Vincent Van Gogh painting an iPhone

#GeekReads: 5 Quick Reads that Made Us Smarter

In this week’s #GeekReads: remembering one of music’s great; gender neutral bathrooms at the White House; facing fears; sensing the gist of the world; avoiding empathy burnout.

The loss of an icon. Prince was a symbol for activism and revolution, who called for change and fought for justice, and the steps he took for social justice will not soon be forgotten. From True Activist.

Gender neutral bathrooms. President Obama opens the first gender neutral restroom at The White House. From Maria Caspani via Charisma News.

Scary stories. One author seeks to empower and inspire her young readers through scary stories. From N.D. Wilson via The Atlantic.

The illusion of realitySome neuroscientists argue that the world is nothing like the one we experience through our senses. From Cell Press via Science Daily.

Empathy burnout. The stress of opening ourselves up to the suffering of others can leave us feeling hardened, but forming a goal to alleviate suffering can make empathy feel less draining. From Jamil Zaki via Nautilus.

 

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Image: flickr/JD Hancock CC BY-2.0

Puppy scared of larger dog

#GeekReads: 5 Quick Reads that Made Us Smarter

In this week’s #GeekReads: political disengagement; Zootopia and “otherness”; refugee resettlement in the United States; fearful possibilities; expectancy-based memory.

Conflict avoidance. A researcher assesses which types of political stimuli might be most stressful to citizens. From The College of William Mary via PHYS.

Predator vs prey. Disney’s latest movie Zootopia shines a line on the politics of fear in the United States. From Scott Lucas via The Conversation.

Refugee resettlement. The U.S. takes in far fewer refugees than its counterparts around the world. Priscilla Alvarez explores complex American responses to refugee resettlement. Via The Atlantic

Uncertainty effect. People are more likely to be stressed out by the possibility of an event than the inevitability of one. From University College London via Science Daily

Memory formation. We are more likely to remember information if there is an expectation that we will need to recall the information in the future. From Penn State via Psy Post.

 

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Image: flickr/Quiddle CC BY-SA 2.0

Blue and yellow beach umbrellas

#GeekReads: 5 Quick Reads that Made Us Smarter

In this week’s #GeekReads: lucky loyalty effect; the youngest published author; problem solving across ideology; the effects of housing segregation on health; brain mechanics behind fear.

The Lucky Loyalty Effect.  New research suggests that consumers believe the more loyal they are to a brand, the more likely they are to receive preferential treatment. Via Cognitive Lode.

Young minds. Nine-year-old Anaya Lee Wullabus is the youngest person in the U.S. to publish a chapter book. From Taryn Finley via The Huffington Post.

Different folks.  Conservatives and liberals don’t differ in their capacity to solve problems; they differ in the processes used to solve them. From Northwestern University via Psy Post.

Drawing lines. A recent study examines the adverse health effects of racial segregation. From Olga Khazan via The Atlantic.

Fear-provoked decisions. Fear and anxiety can over-engage entire brain circuits and disengage brain cells, interfering with decision making. From The University of Pittsburgh via Science Daily.

 

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Image: flickr/Ed Dunens CC BY 2.0

#GeekReads: 5 Quick Reads that Made Us Smarter

In this week’s #GeekReads: the empowering potential of citizen-led science; color and emotion; teaching empathy through dance; uncovering unconscious bias; gender differences in fear behavior.

Citizen-led science. Citizens are taking a more hands-on approach in scientific research and policy decisions that affect their communities. From Andrew Maynard via The Conversation.

Seeing red. Scientists examine the conscious effects of color on our emotions and what behaviors each color evokes. From Danielle Levesque via Psy Post.

Schoolroom salsa. A New York nonprofit brings ballroom dancing to schools to teach kids emotional skills like respect, teamwork, and empathy. From Audrey Cleo Yap via The Atlantic.

Call it like I see it. Unconscious processes, such as a schemas and heuristics, allow us to interpret the physical world and shape our judgment as well as behavior. From Richard E. Nisbett via Nautilus.

Frozen with fear. A study of learned fear behavior in male and female rats may point to possibilities for better treatment for people with PTSD. From Thea Singer via Phys.

 

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Image: flickr/Charlie Marshall CC BY 2.0

Scared cat

#GeekReads: 5 Quick Reads that Made Us Smarter

In this week’s #GeekReads: the benefits of anxiety; story motifs across time; healthy social networks; origins of phobias; links between the amygdala and kindness.

Detecting social threats. Anxious people may process social threats in a different region of the brain than less anxious people. From eLife via Science Daily.

Story skeletons. From perilous journeys to brave new worlds, the structure of storytelling remains much the same across time. From John Yorke via The Atlantic.

Healthy relationships. A recent study finds strong social relationships can help to reduce health risks throughout a person’s life. From University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill via PsyPost.

Pre-wired fear? A lack of understanding of how fear is acquired can lead us to believe that phobias are pre-wired when in fact they may be more of an adaptation. From Graham C.L. Davey Ph.D. via Psychology Today.

Monkeying around. By observing amygdala activity in rhesus macaques, researchers can predict when one monkey will behave charitably toward another. From Michele Berger via Futurity.

 

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Image: flickr/Dat CC BY-ND 2.0

Robot reading

#GeekReads: 5 Quick Reads that Made Us Smarter

In this week’s #GeekReads: the psychological appeal of horror; a controversial depiction of slavery in children’s lit; a voting reform pipe dream; Richard Scarry and the changing times; tricked into disagreeing with ourselves.

Terrify for a living. Author Alana Massey explores what motivates individuals to scare others, while also examining the psychological appeal and impact of horror. Via Pacific Standard.

Bittersweet Dessert. The children’s book A Fine Dessert has some critics concerned about whitewashed representations of slavery. From Leah Donnella via NPR.

Compulsory voting. Could compulsory voting ever be enacted in America? Nicholas Stephanopoulos lays out one possible path, starting at the municipal level. Via The Atlantic.

Illustrating social change. One man’s Flickr set catalogs the subtle but telling revisions made to Richard Scarry’s Best Word Book Ever between 1963 and 1991. From Lisa Wade Ph.D. via Mental Floss.

Selective laziness. A Swedish study drives home the point that we judge reasoning posed by others more harshly than we judge our own. From Melissa Dahl via Science of Us.

 

Mozart ducks

#GeekReads: 5 Quick Reads that Made Us Smarter

In this week’s #GeekReads; false brain claims; fear in the age of robots; the lines of logic vs. the curves of emotion; racial bias in the Florida courts; loaded symbols face public heat.

Classical music ≠ broccoli. Will classical music make you smarter? Debunking some common myths about brain development. From Kate Horowitz via Mental Floss.

Technophobia. Tech-related fears illustrate our tendency to fear things we’re dependent on but cannot control. From Cari Romm via The Atlantic.

Logical or emotional. A meta-analysis of 40 studies suggests both men and women make moral decisions using cognitive reasoning, but women are more likely to use emotional reasoning when harm is a factor. From Danielle Levesque via Psy Post.

Quantifiable racial bias. A study of “stand-your-ground” cases in Florida finds that defendants are twice as likely to be convicted if the victim is white. From Tom Jacobs via Pacific Standard.

Loaded symbols. From Confederate monuments to national sports teams, politically loaded symbols are facing increasing public heat. From Gene Demby via NPR.

 

Tweet us your #GeekReads at @w0nderlab.

Image: flickr/Kirk Siang, CC by 2.0

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