All posts in “Meditation”

Bellanger Gossip statue in Winnipeg

#GeekReads: 5 Quick Reads that Made Us Smarter

In this week’s #GeekReads: gossip as a social skill; the economics of immigration; the view from outer space; living a ‘brain-healthy’ life; political roadblocks.

Hardwired to gossip. Evolutionary psychologists explore the origin of gossip and its prevalence in human society. From The Conversation via Psy Post.

Chasing the American dream. A study by the National Bureau of Economic Research compares waves of immigrants over time and how they fit into the American economy. From Gillian B. White via The Atlantic.

“How’s the view?” One researcher explores how seeing the Earth from space can promote a cognitive shift in awareness. From The Conversation via PHYS.

The brain that changes itself. The science of neuroplasticity has led some to believe that we’re not stuck with the brain we’re born with. From Will Storr via Pacific Standard.

Political gridlock. A political scientist argues that negative feelings, not ideological differences, do more to keep politicians from compromise. From Jim Patterson via Futurity.

 

Tweet us your #GeekReads at @w0nderlab.

Image: flickr/Dano CC BY 2.0

Walkie talkie tin cans

#GeekReads: 5 Quick Reads that Made Us Smarter

In this week’s #GeekReads: learning through communication; compassionate meditation; the fear of going to the movies alone; habits of emotionally intelligent people; justifying cheating.

Talk to me. While humans learn from statistical associations between events and objects, sharing information by communication is just as important for learning. From International School of Advanced Studies via PsyPost.

Refocus. This study suggests that meditation focused on compassionate thoughts for oneself and others can help focus a wandering mind. From Clifton B. Parker via Futurity.

All by myself. Judgment from others is one reason why most people fear doing things alone, but research suggests they often enjoy themselves as much as someone who has company. From Natalie Shoemaker via BigThink.

Office EQ. Learn from the habits that help emotionally intelligent people achieve success in their personal and business relationships. From Eric Schiffer via Business Insider.

Gray areas. People are apt to violate ethical principals to serve their self-interest but only when cheating is easy to justify and not too obvious. From Association for Psychological Science via PsyPost.

 

Tweet us your #GeekReads at @w0nderlab.

Image: flickr/Sebastien Wiertz, CC BY 2.0

#GeekReads: 5 Quick Reads that Made Us Smarter (Jan 17)

In this week’s #GeekReads: Computers that know us better than our friends; getting bored to get creative; meditating to become more empathetic; the psychology of the Internet misogynist; and recruiting job-seeking millennials with a focus on social impact.

 

Bored and brilliant. In a world of tech overstimulation, sometimes the best way to generate creativity is old-fashioned boredom. Via NPR.

Think different. How Zen meditation changed the way that Steve Jobs understood the world and what we can learn from his experience. From Drake Baer via Business Insider.

Computers that really know us. By analyzing the things we like on Facebook, computers may end up knowing us better than our best friends. Is this how Skynet takes over the world (Terminator, for the non-geeks)? Via Futurity.org.

The Internet misogynist. How the anonymity of online comments reveals the sexism lingering in the hearts and minds of many men. From Olga Khazan via The Atlantic.

Mission-minded millennials. How social impact, more than compensation, can attract job-seeking millennials. From Ariel Schwartz via FastCoExist.com.

Tweet us your #GeekReads at @w0nderlab.

 

 

Image: flickr/Louis K., CC BY-SA 2.0

 

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