All posts in “Political Psychology”

old victorian children's books

#GeekReads: 5 Quick Reads that Made Us Smarter

In this week’s #GeekReads: diversifying books; trusting others; new brain technologies; deviating from gender roles; predicting feelings.

Multicultural characters. Author, Dashka Slater, examines the lack of color and diversity in children’s literature. From Dashka Slater via Mother Jones.

Linking causes. New study finds trust is a key motivator in movement participation. From American Sociology Association via Science Daily.

Neuroethics. Scientific advances in brain technologies come with ethical questions. From Andrew Maynard via The Conversation.

Sexism in society. Journalist, Peter Beinart, evaluates why some fear women in positions of power. From Peter Beinart via The Atlantic.

Affective forecasts. Personal prejudice directly affects how empathetic we are towards others. From Association for Psychological Science via Psy Post.

 

 

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Image: flickr/pettifoggist CC BY-SA 2.0

#GeekReads: 5 Quick Reads that Made Us Smarter

In this week’s #GeekReads: partisan media; reading the Constitution; the ideal affect; power of the mind; understanding our social brains.

Spreading disinformation. A recent study suggests that partisan media outlets encourage us to disregard information that fails to support our point of view. From Tom Jacobs via Pacific Standard.

An American read. If you were ever interested in reading the Constitution, here is a nerdy guide to getting started. From Garrett Epps via The Atlantic.

Affect valuation theory. A study from the American Psychological Association examines the relationship between how we would like to feel and how we actually feel. From Marianna Pogosyan Ph.D. via Psychology Today.

Cheering up the world. A clever poem written by a high schooler goes viral with a very inspiring message. From Mark DeNicola via Collective Evolution.

The social brain. Scientists constructed a neurodevelopmental model of a rare genetic disorder that may help explain what makes humans social beings. From University of California at San Diego via PsyPost.

 

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Image: flickr/freyjo7 CC-BY-ND 2.0

Puppy scared of larger dog

#GeekReads: 5 Quick Reads that Made Us Smarter

In this week’s #GeekReads: political disengagement; Zootopia and “otherness”; refugee resettlement in the United States; fearful possibilities; expectancy-based memory.

Conflict avoidance. A researcher assesses which types of political stimuli might be most stressful to citizens. From The College of William Mary via PHYS.

Predator vs prey. Disney’s latest movie Zootopia shines a line on the politics of fear in the United States. From Scott Lucas via The Conversation.

Refugee resettlement. The U.S. takes in far fewer refugees than its counterparts around the world. Priscilla Alvarez explores complex American responses to refugee resettlement. Via The Atlantic

Uncertainty effect. People are more likely to be stressed out by the possibility of an event than the inevitability of one. From University College London via Science Daily

Memory formation. We are more likely to remember information if there is an expectation that we will need to recall the information in the future. From Penn State via Psy Post.

 

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Image: flickr/Quiddle CC BY-SA 2.0

Blue and yellow beach umbrellas

#GeekReads: 5 Quick Reads that Made Us Smarter

In this week’s #GeekReads: lucky loyalty effect; the youngest published author; problem solving across ideology; the effects of housing segregation on health; brain mechanics behind fear.

The Lucky Loyalty Effect.  New research suggests that consumers believe the more loyal they are to a brand, the more likely they are to receive preferential treatment. Via Cognitive Lode.

Young minds. Nine-year-old Anaya Lee Wullabus is the youngest person in the U.S. to publish a chapter book. From Taryn Finley via The Huffington Post.

Different folks.  Conservatives and liberals don’t differ in their capacity to solve problems; they differ in the processes used to solve them. From Northwestern University via Psy Post.

Drawing lines. A recent study examines the adverse health effects of racial segregation. From Olga Khazan via The Atlantic.

Fear-provoked decisions. Fear and anxiety can over-engage entire brain circuits and disengage brain cells, interfering with decision making. From The University of Pittsburgh via Science Daily.

 

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Image: flickr/Ed Dunens CC BY 2.0

Mural of people's faces

#GeekReads: 4 Quick Reads + 1 Watch that Made Us Smarter

In this week’s #GeekReads: the surge of singlehood; hashtag activism; moral flip-flopping; universal story structure; irrational preferences.

Families of choice. There has been a shift in the traditional form of family, from marriage and nuclear families to more of an emphasis on individualism. From Bella DePaulo via Nautilus.

#Change. New research from American University’s Center for Media & Social Impact examines the power of hashtags to ignite movement in social change. From American University via PsyPost.

Moral flip-flopping. Research suggests that, for most individuals, moral character is very stable and not so likely to change. From Gerry Everding via Futurity.

From exposition to denouement. Professor Paul Zak discusses the effects of the classic dramatic arc on our brain chemistry, and ultimately on our decisions and actions. From Future of Storytelling via Aeon.

Rationalizing being irrational. A new study examines how our irrational choices go hand in hand with making better choices overall. From Nathan Collins via Pacific Standard.

 

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Image: flickr/Garry Knight CC BY 2.0

Weighing the brain and heart on a scale

#GeekReads: 5 Quick Reads that Made Us Smarter

In this week’s #GeekReads: a new age of news; emotions vs. reason; how television can inspire altruism; extreme do-gooders; gender bias in the media.

Social media bubbles. Viral news sources, tailored to individual users’ likes and profile characteristics, are contributing to a growing news gap. From Angela Phillips via The Conversation.

Emotion-driven morality. Harvard psychology professor Joshua Greene examines the role of emotions in our moral decision-making. From Lauren Cassani Davis via The Atlantic.

Meaningful media. A recent study suggests people are willing to help others from different groups after watching meaningful, uplifting media. From Penn State via PsyPost.

Extreme altruists. Theoretically, the world would be a better place if we were all do-gooders all of the time, but one author studies the realistic implications. From Regan J. Penaluna via Nautilus.

Seen, not heard. New research finds that women are more often seen in media via pictures than heard through their stories or opinions. From Nathan Collins via Pacific Standard.

 

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Image: flickr/Ajari CC BY 2.0

Bellanger Gossip statue in Winnipeg

#GeekReads: 5 Quick Reads that Made Us Smarter

In this week’s #GeekReads: gossip as a social skill; the economics of immigration; the view from outer space; living a ‘brain-healthy’ life; political roadblocks.

Hardwired to gossip. Evolutionary psychologists explore the origin of gossip and its prevalence in human society. From The Conversation via Psy Post.

Chasing the American dream. A study by the National Bureau of Economic Research compares waves of immigrants over time and how they fit into the American economy. From Gillian B. White via The Atlantic.

“How’s the view?” One researcher explores how seeing the Earth from space can promote a cognitive shift in awareness. From The Conversation via PHYS.

The brain that changes itself. The science of neuroplasticity has led some to believe that we’re not stuck with the brain we’re born with. From Will Storr via Pacific Standard.

Political gridlock. A political scientist argues that negative feelings, not ideological differences, do more to keep politicians from compromise. From Jim Patterson via Futurity.

 

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Image: flickr/Dano CC BY 2.0

Rhinos butting horns

#GeekReads: 5 Quick Reads that Made Us Smarter

In this week’s #GeekReads; overcoming political polarization; the brain-body divide; disrupting flawed mental templates; losing one’s inner monologue; the good that comes from gratitude.

Reframing the argument. Liberal and conservatives both find it hard to frame arguments that appeal to their political opponents’ values. From Rotman School of Management via Psy Post.

Brain-body divide. Cognitive scientist Guy Claxton argues that cognitive processes aren’t as separate from senses and motor functions as once thought. From Jack Meserve via Science of Us.

Disrupting the narrative. A group of writers seek to change the way Islam is seen and represented in American culture. From Emma Green via The Atlantic.

Inner monologue. We often talk to ourselves as a way of processing our own thoughts and emotions, but what happens when a stroke silences some of that inner monologue? From Claire Cameron via Nautilus.

Giving thanks. Gratitude can increase empathy and support personal well-being. From Tania Lombrozo via NPR.

 

Head tilt shadows

#GeekReads: 5 Quick Reads that Made Us Smarter

In this week’s #GeekReads; expressive head movements; looking abroad for policy solutions; innovations in online campaigning; sad songs and the brain; the pros and cons of collaborative problem-solving.

It’s all in your head. Study finds people can accurately use head movements to judge emotions, even in the absence of sound or facial expressions. From McGill University via PsyPost.

Overcoming “exceptionalism.” Political scientist Dominic Tierney argues that America could learn much from policy solutions implemented in other countries. Via The Atlantic.

Target audiences. Political campaigns are using social networks like never before to quickly and effectively send out their political message to target audiences. From Scott Detrow via NPR.

Musical distraction. A study of the effects of music on the brain explores why sad music distracts some listeners from their negative feelings, while exacerbating anxiety for others. From Lori Chandler via Big Think.

The pros and cons of clustering. A study finds that collaboration and connectedness can increase efficiency in sorting through information, but may inhibit diversity in problem-solving approaches. From Sara Rimer via Futurity.

#GeekReads: 5 Quick Reads that Made Us Smarter

In this week’s #GeekReads: variations in what makes us human; empathy’s ability to bridge racial divides; a brief history of groundbreaking television; the neurobiological underpinnings of empathy; debunking anti-immigration myths.

Uniquely human. Scientists release new data from the 1,000 Genomes Project that quantifies the DNA variations of 2,500 people from across the globe. Despite millions of differences in human DNA, we are more alike than different. From Francie Diep via Pacific Standard.

Empathy and race. Can empathy help us to transcend racial divisions? President Obama and Ta-Nehisi Coates offer different perspectives on empathy and race. From John Paul Rollert via The Atlantic.

Learning the Facts of Life. Recent studies suggest that diversity in television combined with the power of storytelling can positively shape attitudes toward people of color, LGBT people and working women. From Lori Chandler via Big Think.

I can relate. A new study helps close the gap in our understanding of the neurobiological mechanisms of empathy. From University of Vienna via PsyPost.

State of immigration. A new report debunks anti-immigrant myths and makes the case for collecting broader and better data on immigrants and their children. From Yasmin Anwar via Futurity.

 

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Image: flickr/MsSaraKelly, Public Domain 

 

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