All posts in “Sexism”

old victorian children's books

#GeekReads: 5 Quick Reads that Made Us Smarter

In this week’s #GeekReads: diversifying books; trusting others; new brain technologies; deviating from gender roles; predicting feelings.

Multicultural characters. Author, Dashka Slater, examines the lack of color and diversity in children’s literature. From Dashka Slater via Mother Jones.

Linking causes. New study finds trust is a key motivator in movement participation. From American Sociology Association via Science Daily.

Neuroethics. Scientific advances in brain technologies come with ethical questions. From Andrew Maynard via The Conversation.

Sexism in society. Journalist, Peter Beinart, evaluates why some fear women in positions of power. From Peter Beinart via The Atlantic.

Affective forecasts. Personal prejudice directly affects how empathetic we are towards others. From Association for Psychological Science via Psy Post.

 

 

Tweet us your #GeekReads at @w0nderlab.

Image: flickr/pettifoggist CC BY-SA 2.0

Robot in the sand

#GeekReads: 5 Quick Reads that Made Us Smarter

In this week’s #GeekReads; empathizing with robot ‘pain’; emotional expressiveness and gender stereotypes; Ferguson in the classroom; literary trigger warnings; when jealousy and empathy collide.

Robo-empathy. A study finds that people have visceral, automatic empathy responses to seeing robots in painful situations. From Greta Weber via Slate.

‘Manly’ restraint. In a recent experiment, participants viewed emotional restraint as a sign of intelligence in men, but as something suspect in women. From Tom Jacobs via Pacific Standard.

Learning from protest. A course called Black Lives Matter: Race, Resistance and Popular Protest at NYU’s Galltin School inspires engaged discourse in an environment of mutual respect. From Errin Whack via NPR.

Reading is risky. Reading carries the potential for emotional and psychological upheaval, offering us challenging experiences that are rarely under our control. From Frank Furedi via Aeon.

When jealousy and empathy collide. A new study suggests we show less neural empathy for those we dislike or view as competition. From Christian Jarrett via Science of Us.

#GeekReads: 5 Quick Reads that Made Us Smarter (Jan 17)

In this week’s #GeekReads: Computers that know us better than our friends; getting bored to get creative; meditating to become more empathetic; the psychology of the Internet misogynist; and recruiting job-seeking millennials with a focus on social impact.

 

Bored and brilliant. In a world of tech overstimulation, sometimes the best way to generate creativity is old-fashioned boredom. Via NPR.

Think different. How Zen meditation changed the way that Steve Jobs understood the world and what we can learn from his experience. From Drake Baer via Business Insider.

Computers that really know us. By analyzing the things we like on Facebook, computers may end up knowing us better than our best friends. Is this how Skynet takes over the world (Terminator, for the non-geeks)? Via Futurity.org.

The Internet misogynist. How the anonymity of online comments reveals the sexism lingering in the hearts and minds of many men. From Olga Khazan via The Atlantic.

Mission-minded millennials. How social impact, more than compensation, can attract job-seeking millennials. From Ariel Schwartz via FastCoExist.com.

Tweet us your #GeekReads at @w0nderlab.

 

 

Image: flickr/Louis K., CC BY-SA 2.0

 

#GeekReads: 5 Quick Reads that Made Us Smarter (Dec 12)

In this week’s #GeekReads, we discover how a 20-minute chat with a gay person can change hearts and minds, the power of Post-Its to get your audiences to take action and much more!

 

To be happy with that club sandwich… We are more satisfied with the choices we make when we engage in the physical act of closure. So shut that menu after you order!

Make it sticky. Sometimes the most effective way to motivate someone is with a sticky, personal touch. The next time you want someone to do something, stick a Post-It on your written appeal. Research shows they are more likely to take action.

Do you really know what you know? We often think we understand complex issues until we are asked to explain it. Turns out, for those who hold extreme views on issues or policies, being confronted with how little they actually know moderates their views.

No sexism, greater creativity. When people in mixed-sex groups are told to be “politically correct,” they generate more creative ideas. 

Chatting to change hearts & minds. When folks spent 20 minutes chatting with an LGBT person, they were more likely to support the freedom to marry.

Tweet us your #GeekReads at @w0nderlab. 

 

Image: flickr/Dean Hochman, CC BY 2.0

 

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