All posts in “Implicit Bias”

Puppy scared of larger dog

#GeekReads: 5 Quick Reads that Made Us Smarter

In this week’s #GeekReads: political disengagement; Zootopia and “otherness”; refugee resettlement in the United States; fearful possibilities; expectancy-based memory.

Conflict avoidance. A researcher assesses which types of political stimuli might be most stressful to citizens. From The College of William Mary via PHYS.

Predator vs prey. Disney’s latest movie Zootopia shines a line on the politics of fear in the United States. From Scott Lucas via The Conversation.

Refugee resettlement. The U.S. takes in far fewer refugees than its counterparts around the world. Priscilla Alvarez explores complex American responses to refugee resettlement. Via The Atlantic

Uncertainty effect. People are more likely to be stressed out by the possibility of an event than the inevitability of one. From University College London via Science Daily

Memory formation. We are more likely to remember information if there is an expectation that we will need to recall the information in the future. From Penn State via Psy Post.

 

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Image: flickr/Quiddle CC BY-SA 2.0

Blue and yellow beach umbrellas

#GeekReads: 5 Quick Reads that Made Us Smarter

In this week’s #GeekReads: lucky loyalty effect; the youngest published author; problem solving across ideology; the effects of housing segregation on health; brain mechanics behind fear.

The Lucky Loyalty Effect.  New research suggests that consumers believe the more loyal they are to a brand, the more likely they are to receive preferential treatment. Via Cognitive Lode.

Young minds. Nine-year-old Anaya Lee Wullabus is the youngest person in the U.S. to publish a chapter book. From Taryn Finley via The Huffington Post.

Different folks.  Conservatives and liberals don’t differ in their capacity to solve problems; they differ in the processes used to solve them. From Northwestern University via Psy Post.

Drawing lines. A recent study examines the adverse health effects of racial segregation. From Olga Khazan via The Atlantic.

Fear-provoked decisions. Fear and anxiety can over-engage entire brain circuits and disengage brain cells, interfering with decision making. From The University of Pittsburgh via Science Daily.

 

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Image: flickr/Ed Dunens CC BY 2.0

Books stacked

#GeekReads: 4 Quick Reads + 1 Watch that Made Us Smarter

In this week’s #GeekReads: Chris Rock takes on Oscar diversity; fighting for public health; The Great Migration; taking a hard look at racial assumptions in publishing; how books can keep us on the edge of our seat.

Exclusion at the awards. Oscar host Chris Rock used comedy to address the reality that people of color are often underrepresented in film and television. From Eric Deggans via NPR.

Empowered by science. One team of researchers and scientists helped to educate and rally the people of Flint, Michigan. Via The Conversation.

The Great Migration. A short film shines light on the migration of six million African Americans from the rural South to the North over a hundred years ago. From Carlos Javier Ortiz via The Atlantic.

Disparities in publishing. New York Times Magazine editor Chris Jackson discusses how editors’ assumptions can shrink writers of color to a sliver of their identity. From Brandon Tensley via Pacific Standard.

“Not all was as it seemed.” A team of Stanford grad students examine where emotions like suspense come from when we read. From Clifton B. Parker via Futurity.

 

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Image: flickr/Moyan Brenn CC BY 2.0

#GeekReads: 5 Quick Reads that Made Us Smarter

In this week’s #GeekReads: the empowering potential of citizen-led science; color and emotion; teaching empathy through dance; uncovering unconscious bias; gender differences in fear behavior.

Citizen-led science. Citizens are taking a more hands-on approach in scientific research and policy decisions that affect their communities. From Andrew Maynard via The Conversation.

Seeing red. Scientists examine the conscious effects of color on our emotions and what behaviors each color evokes. From Danielle Levesque via Psy Post.

Schoolroom salsa. A New York nonprofit brings ballroom dancing to schools to teach kids emotional skills like respect, teamwork, and empathy. From Audrey Cleo Yap via The Atlantic.

Call it like I see it. Unconscious processes, such as a schemas and heuristics, allow us to interpret the physical world and shape our judgment as well as behavior. From Richard E. Nisbett via Nautilus.

Frozen with fear. A study of learned fear behavior in male and female rats may point to possibilities for better treatment for people with PTSD. From Thea Singer via Phys.

 

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Image: flickr/Charlie Marshall CC BY 2.0

Faces on the subway

#GeekReads: 5 Quick Reads that Made Us Smarter

In this week’s #GeekReads: how dogs process human faces; the queer legacy of Ziggy Stardust; a Fitbit for feelings; the production of vocal emotion; anti-Muslim bias in the media.

Written on your face. A study finds that dogs are able to recognize and categorize human emotional states. From University of Lincoln via Science Daily.

Defying labels. David Bowie lived a life that defied labels and influenced a generation of LGBT youth. From Catherine Kustanczy via Pacific Standard.

Fitbit for feelings. A new wristband gathers data from your body to graph a visualization of your emotion levels throughout the day. From Michele Debczak via Mental Floss.

Tone it down. By digitally altering the tone of a speaker’s voice, researchers uncover new insights about vocal emotional perception. From Lund University via Psy Post.

Muslims in the media. A study finds that exposure to negative media representations of Muslims may increase support for anti-Muslim public policies. From Jared Wadley via Futurity.

 

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Image: flickr/Transformer18 CC BY 2.0

3D glasses

#GeekReads: 5 Quick Reads that Made Us Smarter

In this week’s #GeekReads; reading emotions in 3D; socially-relevant curricula; investigating the racial wealth gap; standing up (or staying seated) for what’s right; Pixar’s first non-white lead.

Amplified emotions. New research finds that 3D displays of facial expressions evoke stronger emotional reactions than 2D photos. From Aalto University via Psy Post.

Shifting curriculum. A white fifth-grade teacher shares her journey of shifting classroom curriculum to explore the subjects that matter most to her students. From Valerie Strauss via The Washington Post.

Getting ahead. Reporter Mel Jones examines some of the reasons why the racial wealth gap still exists among Millennials. From Adrian Florido via NPR.

More to the story. Rosa Parks’ refusal to give up her bus seat on December 1, 1955, was one day in the life of a battle-tested freedom fighter. From Nshira Turkson via The Atlantic.

Sanjay’s Super Team. Pixar’s new animated short tells the story of a young boy’s journey to bridge the generational and cultural gaps between his American and Indian heritage. From Madeleine Thomas via Pacific Standard.

 

Mozart ducks

#GeekReads: 5 Quick Reads that Made Us Smarter

In this week’s #GeekReads; false brain claims; fear in the age of robots; the lines of logic vs. the curves of emotion; racial bias in the Florida courts; loaded symbols face public heat.

Classical music ≠ broccoli. Will classical music make you smarter? Debunking some common myths about brain development. From Kate Horowitz via Mental Floss.

Technophobia. Tech-related fears illustrate our tendency to fear things we’re dependent on but cannot control. From Cari Romm via The Atlantic.

Logical or emotional. A meta-analysis of 40 studies suggests both men and women make moral decisions using cognitive reasoning, but women are more likely to use emotional reasoning when harm is a factor. From Danielle Levesque via Psy Post.

Quantifiable racial bias. A study of “stand-your-ground” cases in Florida finds that defendants are twice as likely to be convicted if the victim is white. From Tom Jacobs via Pacific Standard.

Loaded symbols. From Confederate monuments to national sports teams, politically loaded symbols are facing increasing public heat. From Gene Demby via NPR.

 

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Image: flickr/Kirk Siang, CC by 2.0

Frosted cupcakes on display

#GeekReads: 5 Quick Reads that Made Us Smarter

In this week’s #GeekReads: gratitude’s sweet side effects; how coming out increases empathy; biases about biases; how segregation leads to hate; the social impact of suppressing emotions.

Sweet talk. Flavor classifications are used as metaphors for emotions, but research has found that feelings of gratitude can actually lead to increased consumption of sweets. From Ed Kromer via Futurity.

The empathic impact of coming out. A study finds that white gay and bisexual men are more empathetic toward other minority groups than white heterosexual men. From University of Houston via PsyPost.

Bias blind spot. Since biases operate unconsciously, we are quick to see biases in others but have trouble noticing them in ourselves. From Jim Davies via Nautilus.

Segregation’s toll. Read civil rights leader A. Philip Randolph’s perspective on the emotional chain reactions of social segregation. From Big Think Editors via Big Think.

Fake it ’til you make it? Social psychologists study the negative ramifications of suppressing emotional responses. From Jesse Singal via Science of Us.

 

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Image: flickr/Martin Kirkegaard, CC BY-ND 2.0

Behind the Mask

#GeekReads: 4 Quick Reads + 1 Watch that Made Us Smarter

In this week’s #GeekReads: unlocking our unconscious memories; relating to characters; an optimistic view of behavioral economics; gender normativity; talking about race in a “color-blind” world.

Unlocking the unconscious. New research has identified a region of the brain that has the ability to hide fear-related memories in the brain, as well as the ability to retrieve them. From Christopher Bergland via Psychology Today.

What’s in a word? Egyptian author Alaa Al Aswany talks about how one word in a Dostoyevsky novel captures the empathy-inducing potential of literature. From Joe Fassier via The Atlantic.

Irrational you. A behavioral economist argues that it’s not pessimistic to say that humans are often irrational; sometimes acknowledging irrationality creates room for improvement. From Dan Ariely via Big Think.

Gender essentialism. While gender definitions are expanding, gendered norms still trump many other social norms that structure our agency and lived experiences. From Charlotte Witt via Aeon.

The “color-blind” bind. Research explores the impact teaching “racial color-blindness” could have on identity formation for children of color. From Jesse Singal via Science of Us.

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Image: flickr/JD Hancock CC BY 2.0

Danbo walks the tightrope

#GeekReads: 4 Quick Reads + 1 Watch that Made Us Smarter

In this week’s #GeekReads: re-categorizing fear and anxiety; the pitfalls of overconfidence; insights from an Afghan therapist; facing fears; dissecting Daffy Duck.

Dissociating disorders. Although fear and anxiety are grouped together under “anxiety disorders,” research indicates there is a distinct difference in how the two react to the reduction of serotonin in the brain. From Sage Publications via Psy Post.

Slow it down. Psychologist Daniel Kahneman discusses the blight of overconfidence and the benefits of slowing down our thoughts. From David Shariatmadari via The Guardian.

Talk to her. In a place where symptoms of depression, anxiety, and post-traumatic stress disorder are widespread, a woman offers her empathy and calm presence as medicine for her mental health patients. From Mariam Jalalzada via The New York Times.

Prepare for takeoff. Author and professor Gina Barreca, fearless in many aspects of life, considers the complex sources of her overwhelming fear of flying. Via Psychology Today.

Character sketches. Loony Tunes animator Chuck Jones shares how a combination of simplicity, movement, and discipline  made each character so distinct and memorable. From Dan Solomon via Fast Company.

 

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Image: flickr/Carlo Ciccarelli CC BY SA 2.0

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